Saturday, 18 May 2019

Link Roundup - May 2019

Robert and Loretta GouldJohn Fleming Gould's family donated his artwork to Syracuse University's Special Collections Research Center.

Robert Gould holds two of his artist father's General Electric school and college posters in which he and his brother, Bill, were models (Photo from the Times Herald-Record)
Robert Gould holds two of his artist father's General Electric school and college posters in which he and his brother, Bill, were models (Photo from the Times Herald-Record)

Some sketches from John Fleming Gould's notebooks (Photo from the Times Herald-Record)
Some sketches from John Fleming Gould's notebooks (Photo from the Times Herald-Record)

Review of Strange Tales, June 1932

Strange Tales, a rare Clayton pulp, was a rival of Weird Tales. It lasted for only 7 issues, but is much sought after. This review of the June 1932 issue shows why: great stories by Hugh B. Cave, Robert E. Howard and Clark Ashton Smith and most of the best authors from Weird Tales.


Strange Tales, June 1932
Strange Tales, June 1932

Harold Lamb article by Howard Andrew Jones

Harold Lamb and  his most famous creation, Khlit the Cossack
Howard Andrew Jones traces the influence of Harold Lamb on Dungeons and Dragons, and Robert E. Howard.

Smart Blonde (1937)

Frederick Nebel's McBride and Kennedy stories were made into a series of movies by Warner Brothers. The character of the female reporter Torchy Blane was loosely based on Kennedy. 



A.R. Mitchell Museum of Western Art

I've always wanted to visit this museum. A.R. Mitchell was one of the best pulp artists. He was taught by Harvey Dunn, whose impressionistic use of color clearly influenced Mitchell.

Was reminded of the museumby this article:

Within this Trinidad museum named in his honor, you will want to see the pulp art created by A.R. Mitchell. He was one of the foremost artists featured on pulp magazine covers, and his work displayed at this museum spans a period from the 1920s to the 1950s. 

Housed in a turn-of-the-century building, the A. R. Mitchell Museum of Western Art also has many great examples of Hispanic and Native American art along with historic photographs of many iconic Colorado locations. If you love architecture, this place is worth a stop just to see the building. It has a tin ceiling, walls painted with period-appropriate paint and a beautiful staircase.

More on Arthur Mitchell in this video from one of his students, including a few of his covers:



2 comments:

  1. Sai, you have outdone yourself with this great post. Here are my comments, subject by subject:

    John Fleming Gould--I met Gould back at the 1990 Wayne, NJ Pulpcon. He made an appearance and drew a sketch of Herr Doktor Kruger for me. I still have it.

    STRANGE TALES--I've had several sets of this great title over the years. It's a shame it only lasted 7 years because it was even better than WEIRD TALES. This magazine was the true tragedy of the collapse of the entire chain of Clayton pulps. Now I have my set in the form of the Gerasol reprints.

    Harold Lamb--One of my all time favorite adventure writers. One of the reasons I have a complete set of the 753 pulp issues of ADVENTURE. Howard Andrew Jones did us all a great service when he edited the 8 volumes of the complete Harold Lamb stories.

    Nebel's Kennedy and McBride series--This just about sums up Hollywood. Take a good hardboiled series about a reporter with a drinking problem and a tough cop and turn the reporter into a blonde.

    Arthur Mitchell--One of the great western pulp painters. Much to my shame and disappointment I still do not have an example of his cover art. There is a book about his art titled MITCH.

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  2. I see I made a mistake on STRANGE TALES above. I wish it lasted 7 years! Unfortunately it only lasted 7 issues.

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